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Alexander Buk-Swienty

Alexander Buk-Swienty has 9 articles published.

Ark Review

“Like is the digital Amen”. Book Review: Psychopolitics by Byung-Chul Han

Cultural theorist Byung-Chul Han’s Psychopolitics: Neoliberalism and New Technologies of Power (2017) provides a pessimistic view of the status of freedom in modern society. He argues, neoliberal politics coupled with technological innovations have resulted in the age of psychopolitics: the subjugation of the mind. A spectre is haunting Byung-Chul Han – the spectre of Foucault.… Keep Reading

Ark Review

The Worst Reads of 2017

Ark volunteers pick and present their worst reads of 2017. The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai Perhaps it’s a bit unfair to call this my worst read of 2017. This novel has, after all, won the Man Booker Prize. However, having read several Man Booker Prize winners over the years, I couldn’t help but… Keep Reading

Ark Review

The Best Reads of 2017

Ark volunteers pick and present their favourite reads of 2017. The Melancholy of Resistance by László Krasznahorkai What if sense requires a certain amount of nonsense to make sense? And what if you get too close to this nonsense inherent in the production of sense? Then, I wager, you get the surrealism of The Melancholy… Keep Reading

Ark Review/Book reviews

Review: What IS Sex? by Alenka Zupančič

The Lacanian philosopher Alenka Zupančič’ new book What IS Sex? (2017) is Zupančič at her absolute finest. Zupančič compellingly destabilizes any notion you might have of a sound ontological foothold in the world. One does not simply be with Zupančič. Rather than reject human sexuality as something for the meanderings of sexologists or scoffingly dismissed… Keep Reading

Ark Review/Essays

Why Tom McCarthy’s “Satin Island” isn’t Kafkaesque

Satin Island by Tom McCarthy is not Kafkaesque as the recent review by Dr. Macon Holt suggests. To illustrate why, the following essay will attempt two things: First, a brief look at what Kafkaesque actually means. The argument here is that Kafka’s literature centers on the (Lacanian) big Other and thus the dictionary definition of the Kafkaesque… Keep Reading

Ark Review/Essays

Proof that Kafka Read Lacan: Reading Kafka with Lacan

Previously on Reading Kafka with Lacan, we have dealt with how the ‘external’ law machine and ‘internal’ configurations of Kafka’s characters play out in Franz Kafka’s major works, The Castle (1926) and The Trial  (1925).1 In the following however, rather than attempt such a broad analysis of Kafka’s major themes, I will be focussing on his… Keep Reading

Ark Review/Essays

The Violence of Language and Literature

Language is not merely a pure and neutral tool but on the contrary, it is a violent thing that introduces division I want to outline some notes towards the consequences of the idea of language as, at its very basic operation, a violent order. For this I turn to Slavoj Žižek’s reflection on the subject in… Keep Reading

Essays

Your Neighbor Will Kill You: Reading Kafka with Lacan

In my previous column on Kafka and Lacan we looked at the operation of the Law in Kafka’s novels. I argued that Kafka’s work demonstrates that the Law is situated in the Lacanian dimension of the Real. That is, Kafka’s Law is situated beyond the limit of any hermeneutic capability, and yet the Law as… Keep Reading

Ark Review/Essays

The Law Ex-ists: Reading Kafka with Lacan

A reading of Kafka’s Law as a non-existent existence. We begin, of course, with an excerpt from “Before the Law,” Kafka’s famous parable from his novel The Trial (1925): “Before the law stands a doorkeeper. To this doorkeeper there comes a man from the country and prays for admittance to the Law. But the doorkeeper says… Keep Reading

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